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4 Messages

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100 Points

Sun, Feb 21, 2021 12:43 AM

Trying to decide whether to get dentures

I have only 5 teeth in the front, the rest were pulled. I have been wearing a partial for over 10 years, and it’s problematic. I have a very hard time chewing food, lettuce is a terrible issue, the partial doesn’t really cut into food. My dentist suggested an upper denture, after having the five remaining teeth pulled. I would receive an immediate denture. 
I’m in the cosmetics industry, it is very important to look presentable for my career, and I’m worried about that, but I’m also worried about pain. Is it possible that because I only have to have 5 extractions I will have an easier time? 
Will having dentures be easier to deal with than this ridiculous partial that doesn’t really look or work that well for me? 
Should I just screw up my courage and do it? 

Responses

3 Messages

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100 Points

11 days ago

Please try as hard as you can to get implants. Though expensive, they are so so so so worth it. If you end up having to get a denture, your face ends up drooping over the years - I got mine 13 years ago - but if it's well made, it is easy to deal with. Have it relined every couple of years (covered by dental insurance) and you shouldn't need adhesives. The pain is nonexistent after the extractions; if any, it will go away quickly enough. It should work better than a partial.

(edited)

4 Messages

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100 Points

@priscilla_wilson I have osteoporosis and am on Prolia. My dentist is reluctant to do implants for these reasons. At this point, it’s either continuing with the partial or getting the upper denture. I so appreciate your input, I want to hear from someone who has experience with this. Thank you for answering. Bottom line seems to be go with the dentures. I’m relieved to hear the pain is negligible. Are you able to return to work relatively quickly?

3 Messages

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100 Points

I work at home by computer, so it was not a problem for me. As I recall, it didn't take long to get used to them. I have heard others had a worse time, so I guess it's case by case. Good luck!

88 Messages

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3.9K Points

11 days ago

Jeannie: I was in the same position you are in about 4 years ago. I had worn an upper partial for many years, and the teeth kept breaking off. I went to a new dentist and told her I was frustrated with the partial, and I wanted her to take a close look at my remaining teeth. I was not convinced that a full denture was what I wanted until she told me what I was facing: several root canals and crowns to restore the few remaining teeth on top.

The decision was not hard. I had the 7 remaining upper teeth removed and a full denture placed. My lower teeth were in much better shape and I was able to keep most of them and I now wear a lower partial.

To your point: having worn a partial for many years made the transition to a full denture quite easy, and since I only had 7 upper extractions (plus 3 lower ones) in two visits, the pain was manageable. I was off the pain relievers in 7 days and back to more or less normal within 2 weeks.

I do not recommend that anyone get dentures without consulting with a competent - not a discount - dentist who has a good relationship with a first-rate dental lab. That requires a little research. But I will tell you that I am extremely happy that I made this decision, and I'm working hard to save my 12 remaining lower teeth.

Upper dentures are much easier to get used to and manage than lower dentures, and you should do everything you can to save your lower teeth. My upper denture does not cause me any trouble, nor should yours.

Each of us is unique, and our experiences will differ. But I will tell you that based on my experience, the transition from an upper partial to a full upper denture was one of the best things I've ever done. Good luck to you. Joseph

4 Messages

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100 Points

Thank you so much for your reply. My lower teeth are in pretty good shape, and I take assiduously good care to keep them that way! 
When you had the extractions, did you have an immediate denture? If so, do you keep them in without removing them for a period of time, or do you take them out for sleeping, etc.? 
Do you think your smile looks better than with a partial? I am very self conscious about my smile, at this point anyway. 
Do you keep your immediate denture indefinitely, or do you get a different one after a period of time? 
I have been struggling with my partial for so long, I think I should just go for the denture, it’s just a little daunting to think about losing my front teeth. 

95 Messages

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2.4K Points

Yes, I had dentures put in immediately after the extractions.  It has been many years ago, but I do not recall any big issues with them.  I believe you typically leave them in for awhile, but your dentist will tell you how to deal with that.  I will tell you that I do not take my dentures out at night even now.  I only take them out to clean or reline them.  I got a new set a few years ago.  I had my original set for over 20 years.  Over time your gums will probably recede, making the original dentures too lose for comfort.  You are so lucky to have your lower teeth!  Those are the dentures that are the most problematic to keep in place.  I have never regretted getting my bad teeth all pulled and having dentures.

  

4 Messages

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100 Points

Thank you!! These answers make me feel less alone and more comfortable with everything. 

(edited)

95 Messages

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2.4K Points

11 days ago

I have never regretted getting my upper denture.  The lowers are a bigger problem, but my upper has been great for many, many years.

234 Messages

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4.5K Points

11 days ago

I would not.  I would not get rid of good teeth in lieu of a denture.  No way would I do that.  I would learn how to make a partial so that I could explain to the dentist what is needed as a good partial for me.  Cheap dentures have dull teeth that cannot cut into something as delicate as lettuce.  Have the dentist sharpen them or sharpen them yourself.  Spend the money it takes to get a great partial, dentures SUCK!

88 Messages

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3.9K Points

11 days ago

Jeannie: No one disputes that your own teeth are superior for cutting into lettuce or chewing or biting anything, and only an idiot would have their teeth removed for convenience. However, many of us on here have gotten to a place where there is no practical alternative to dentures. And as Nola and I have suggested, it has worked out quite well for us.

I will answer your questions as best as I can in order. I had an immediate denture placed on the day of the last extraction. My dentist advised me to keep it in for at least 24 hours since it acts like a bandage.

After that she said to remove it every night for cleaning and do not sleep in it, which is what I do. Dental science says that it is best not to sleep in your dentures since it hastens resorption of your gums, which is what causes the sunken look. My experience suggests that is correct. 

My smile is definitely much, much better, and I no longer worry about the partial breaking which it did constantly. I am wearing the same denture I was given the day of my last extraction, and I have had one reline after the healing was completed.

Dentures do have to be replaced once in a while because no matter how careful you are gums still recede over time, and the dentures become loose. My dentist tells me that I can expect my dentures to last 5 to 10 years, and it varies widely between individuals. I have had mine for 4 years without problems, and I don't need adhesive to keep them in place. The key is to find a good dentist and an excellent dental lab. Bargain dentures will have to be replaced much more often, and they don't fit well in the first place.

You are correct. Saving the lower teeth should be a top priority going forward, and that's why I see my dentist 3 times a year. Lower dentures are much more problematical than upper dentures since they don't have the anchor of the upper palate. I have told my dentist that if I lose my lower teeth, I want implants, and that's another reason to forestall resorption.

Finally, you have osteoporosis and I have type 2 diabetes. Each disease brings special concerns when dealing with dental issues. Make sure your dentist is aware of any underlying medical conditions before any procedure, even a routine cleaning or periodontal treatment.

I believe you along with your dentist will make a good decision and that you will be pleased with the result. Most of us on here are very happy with our decisions, and we have benefited from the advice of our fellow denture wearers. All the best to you. Joseph 

7 Messages

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132 Points

9 days ago

I suggest saving any permanent teeth and working to get a better partial.  I've had an upper partial since last November (had to have last 3 remaining front teeth pulled) and I don't like how it makes my upper lip stick out.  The oral surgeon put in the partial the same day of extraction and told me to sleep in it the first night but I couldn't because I had two bleeding incidents and it was easier to control without having it in.  Luckily I didn't experience any pain (although I did take one ibuprofen about an hour before the procedure) but didn't need to take any afterwards.  I also have trouble eating with it and remove when eating and when speaking I sometimes have a lisp.  My last follow-up was a few weeks go but my dentist says it seems to fit good for now and no adjustment needed as I'm not experiencing any pain/discomfort and to practice eating with it (told him I wasn't eating with it - will let him know about this issue at next appointment and also ask about better partial options).  Hope this helps.