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1 Message

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70 Points

Sat, Jul 8, 2017 5:42 PM

Terrified

I am having all uppers and all but three lowers pulled on Tuesday. I am having an immediate. denture made by a prostodontist. I am terrified. I have severe gum disease that I have had treated in the past, but they are really bad now! I'm sure they are infected. Bleed whenever I brush. I can't wait to get them out, but am worried about the oral surgery and recovery. I am a professional. Admissions director at a private school. I talk a lot in my job! I am taking almost 2 weeks off. I hope that will be enough, I need helpful encouragement!

Responses

30 Messages

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724 Points

3 years ago

Two weeks is plenty of time......takes four or five days for the swelling to subside.....They will not fit right so don't be disappointed...Stock up with Fixodent or Secure....(adhesives)..Only eat easy lunches when in public...(soups and smooth things) nothing that can get under dentures....Bring adhesives with you....

125 Messages

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3.3K Points

3 years ago

I'm afraid too of getting mine done BUT I have found this forum to be full of people whom share their tips and tricks for having a successful outcome. I have a post someone addressed to me saved that shares some helpful info on what to expect. I will find it and get it to you in a bit.


The biggest thing I'VE learned so far is that it is going to be important to advocate for ourselves and keep in contact with our denture makers. I'm spending good money for my procedure and new teeth and I want to be able to wear them successfully.


Keep us posted.

125 Messages

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3.3K Points

3 years ago

THIS IS A REPOST OF A MEMBER'S RESPONSE TO A COMMENT I HAD MADE. FULL OF SOME GOOD WORDS OF ADVICE AND ENCOURAGEMENT.

Margaret: I had all of my upper teeth removed and a few lowers with the last extractions on March 8, 2017. I had an immediate full denture inserted on that day and a lower partial later. No one who is honest will tell you that this will be a walk in the park. And everyone on here understands as well that just because one of us had a good - or bad - experience that that will be what you can expect.

But the odds are greatly in your favor, and the decision to resolve your dental issues will be one of the best decisions you've ever made. A good, compassionate dentist and a highly competent dental lab is essential to a good experience. Mine has been a good one, and I give them great credit for it. I also give credit to the people on here and a couple of friends who had been wearing dentures for years for schooling me on what to expect.

My friends encouraged me when I needed it most, and the people on here - most of them anyway - covered essentially all the blank spots in my education. On the day my full denture was placed, I had developed a list of 10 or 12 questions as a direct result of conversations that had taken place on here. I threw it away after all my questions were answered, but I could probably reconstruct it if I had to. You can easily do the same for your own particular situation. I - and virtually anyone else on here - would be glad to help, but you can do it yourself.

But here a few things I learned in the process. 1) Wearing an upper partial for 30 years helped me tremendously (fewer extractions, better suction from the start because of partially healed gums, staging the 12 extractions on 3 days instead of just one). Almost 4 months later I wear an adhesive only occasionally and have had no relines of my temporary upper denture.

2) Four to six warm salt water rinses each day do wonders.

3) Watch for leukoplakia. Sounds terrible, but those are the white spots that form on your gums when the denture rubs and causes soreness or pain. It's easy for the dentist to resolve, and a good dentist will respond to your needs immediately and as often as you need them to.

4) The value of "Magic Mouthwash" is marginal in my opinion, but I got some. It may have helped a little. Google it and you're find that it's nothing but something like benadryl, Maalox and a mild painkiller. The mix is over the counter.

5) Keep the dentures in at least 24 hours to form a bandage for the wounds. My dentist told me then to remove them at night - every night - forever. I soak them in Stain Away and it works very well. Some people soak them for a short period and sleep in them, but it's a question to ask your dentist. My advice is to take them out at night.

6) After about 10 days most of the wounds should have healed, and that's when I started gently brushing my gums in addition to my remaining teeth. It feels great, your mouth feels clean again and it helps get rid of shards of tooth or bone that are common and gradually work their way to the surface. They can cause some real pain, and there were days early on when I dreaded putting the upper denture in. But that passed fairly quickly.

7) The last teeth were removed on March 8, and I took my last pain reliever on March 15 to give you idea of what you might expect. I had 2 followup meetings with the dentist during the first 2 weeks to address immediate issues like leukoplakia.

8) You will have to eat soft food for a while, and you will have to learn to eat using both sides of your mouth and your tongue. Gradually you will add harder foods to your diet, and I was more or less back to normal within 2 months.

9) There are foods that do give me trouble, and the worst ones are the skins of fruits and vegetables. I simply can't bite into an apple with the temporary denture. As a consequence I have slowed down when I eat, I cut all foods into smaller pieces and I just avoid eating anything that is likely to cause problems. The good news is that I eat much less, I eat fewer snacks and I'm back to my ideal weight.

10) You probably will not have the "bite force" you had with your natural teeth, and you will have to compensate for that. Some of us used our real teeth for a third hand, and that is over for me. We just have to find a way to do things in a different way much as those who lose a limb do. Make no mistake about this: we have suffered amputations of a critically important body part and we all have to retrain ourselves.

11) I do not know your personal circumstances, but I will say this. Do not be self conscious about your dentures. If you have found a good dentist and a good dental lab, no one is going to know unless you tell them. And the good people of this world - the good men and women - want to see a nice smile and the good person behind it, and we could not care less if the teeth are real or the result of good dental work. If anyone you meet or know has a problem with someone wearing dentures, they are not worth spending any time with anyway.

12) Finally, some on here have had a difficult time with their dentures. Most have not. But even they have taken a positive step forward for their long-term health, since bad teeth can cause significant, even life-threatening, problems down the line.

The bottom line for you is this: You've made a good decision for your overall health, the pain soon will be gone, your smile will light up a room again, your self-confidence will improve and, most likely, your waistline will start heading in the right direction. At least mine did. All the best to you. The people on here are behind you 100%.

43 Messages

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904 Points

3 years ago

That about sums it up. That is very good Margaret.

77 Messages

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3.8K Points

3 years ago

Margie & Margaret: I know extraction day is imminent, and I wanted to add a couple of thoughts for you. First, if you have a choice and can stand it, choose local, not general, anesthetic. That is a principle all of us should live by, physicians and dentists included. General anesthetics are an assault on the system, and they should be avoided whenever possible.

Reactions are unpredictable, and older people are especially vulnerable to their side effects. That's why so many older people succumb to their broken hips. The hips are easy to fix, the after effects of general anesthetics are not. General anesthetics clearly have their place, but if you have a choice go with a local. I'm not a doctor, but in 13 years as a hospital administrator I learned why anesthesiologists pay some of the highest prices for malpractice insurance. A bad outcome was usually not their fault, but they still get the blame when something goes terribly wrong.

There is something else. You should never be self-conscious about your dentures. I know it's tougher on women than men, since we live in a society that puts inordinate emphasis on appearance as opposed to character. Some women who are married are often afraid of their husband's reactions to the dentures, and some single women wonder if anyone will want to go out with them. I want to say this emphatically again: To good people and to good partners it simply will not matter.

Your support group begins at home, and you are entitled to understanding and privacy. For my part - and I know I'm a guy and the worst part for me is not being able to tie a fly fishing knot using my new teeth - I'm not self-conscious at all. But I do not want to be seen without my teeth at any time. You have the right to some space when you're dealing with the dentures, and when I take them out at night I do so in the dark. That's why I had a temporary, immediate upper denture placed after the last extractions. If you can afford it, that is the best way to go. Going without teeth for any period was simply not an option for me.

For Margie, I am now a college professor, and I taught two separate courses at the same time I had the extractions last spring. Although there was about a week when I would have preferred to be somewhere else than the classroom, I made it, lecturing for an hour at a time five days a week. You can make it just fine, too. Just pace yourself. Your 2-week window should be more than enough. 

Having said that, some must go extended periods without teeth, and the emotional burden is heavy. I hope that is something neither of you has to endure. That's when a supportive partner and a supportive workplace is absolutely essential to a better experience.

Finally, ask your dentist who his/her backup is in the event they are out of town or ill during a dental emergency. Dentists are a tight group (they have one of the strongest political lobbies in the US), and there is no excuse for not having a backup.

So go confidently forward, secure in the knowledge you are making a good decision that will have huge benefits through the years. Good luck and God speed. Joseph 

 

 

77 Messages

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3.8K Points

All: Just to be clear, there are many circumstances in which a general is preferable to a local anesthetic. It should not be a source of excessive concern for those of you still facing extraction day. The point I am making is that staging the extractions in a dentist's office using local anesthesia is one alternative; the other is to have them all done by an oral surgeon using a general anesthetic at one time. I have done it both ways (8 under a general, 4, 4 and 4 under a local). Just have the conversation with your dentist and do what the two of you agree is the best course of action for you. And good luck. Joseph

208 Messages

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6.4K Points

3 years ago

Two weeks should be plenty.  I work retail and I was back at it in a week with no real problems talking.

You'll do great.  Keep us posted!

51 Messages

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1.1K Points

3 years ago

Two weeks as stated above should be more than enough. I only had all uppers pulled and immediate put in. I only took 3-4 days off, and while still a little swollen, all was OK. I just told some people at work that I had dental surgery. No need to go into specifics unless you want to. I agree with local anesthesia if possible. From my experience, it's an easier recovery. You will talk fine. Good luck!!!

208 Messages

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6.4K Points

3 years ago

How ya doin, Margie?  Everything go ok?